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Written by Minister of Information JR Valrey    Wednesday, 25 March 2015 21:19    PDF Print E-mail
Filmmaker Pendarvis Harshaw talks about graf legend Mike Dream in ‘Dream Kontinues’ doc

TDK, which originally stood for Those Damn Kids, describing Mike “Dream” Francisco’s crew, later morphed into Tax Dollars Kill as Mike matured. His surviving murals are strictly off-limits to tagging by other graffiti writers.

TDK, which originally stood for Those Damn Kids, describing Mike “Dream” Francisco’s crew, later morphed into Tax Dollars Kill as Mike matured. His surviving murals are strictly off-limits to tagging by other graffiti writers.

by The People’s Minister of Information JR

In 1988, when I was 10 years old, I had my first run-in with the police. It was in an apartment complex I lived in in Alameda known as the Buena Vista apartments aka the BVs. I got caught with $200 in illegal fireworks: bottle rockets, firecrackers, flowers, roman candles and M-80s. I was hustling them to other pre-teens and teens in the area, right before the 4th of July.

My supplier was a Filipino guy about eight or nine years older than me named Mike Dream, who lived on the other side of the apartment complex. Since he was Asian, he could buy illegal fireworks in Oakland Chinatown legally and then resell them.

Years earlier my family had met Mike, after his brother Lil John and his crew used to breakdance in front of my patio with radios and linoleum. My mother and her new husband would spend anywhere from $500 to $1,000 with Mike a week.

After getting the fireworks in Alameda, they would resell them for a profit on the streets of East Oakland to my uncles who, at the time, were drug dealers. That is the story of how I came to know Mike Dream, the legendary TDK Bay Area graf artist, who was also affiliated with the legendary Hobo Junction Hip Hop crew.

Mike Dream’s brother Lil John with a TDK mural

Mike Dream’s brother Lil John with a TDK mural

In ‘99-2000, I saw Mike at an event at the Malonga Center in downtown Oakland. By this time he was already a legend on the Bay Area graf scene. David Johnson of the San Quentin 6 tried to introduce us, not knowing that at that point we had known each other for well over a decade and a half.

Mike Dream told me that he was happy to see me getting political. At the event, we vowed to hook up. I later heard that he was shot dead on a street in West Oakland.

Filmmaker Pendarvis Harshaw was a teenager when I met him on his way to Howard University. Years earlier I had mentored his running buddy Jesus El and talked extensively to both of them about the need for Black journalists. Pendarvis took the info and ran with it, eventually graduating with a master’s degree in journalism from UC Berkeley.

Check out Pendarvis Harshaw in his own words as he talks about Mike Dream, TDK and “The Dream Kontinues” documentary.

M.O.I. JR: What made you want to do a documentary about the legendary Bay Area graf artist Mike Dream?

Pendarvis: My movie opens with a shot of the old Menlo Hotel, a spot on 13th and Webster in downtown Oakland. That’s where I used to live.

On the side of the building, there was a small mural on some plywood. I simply wanted to know the story behind it. I wanted to know who did it, why they did it and what it meant – and how graffiti was viewed by people in Oakland. And I got mixed reviews: To some people, it’s an eyesore. To others, it’s a sight for sore eyes.

M.O.I. JR: Who is Mike Dream to the local region?

TDK The Dream Kontinues DVDs

Pendarvis: Mike “Dream” Francisco is one of the first internationally known muralists from Oakland. He was one of the founding members of TDK; a group that started off as some high school trouble makers and grew into a posse that still paints to this day – now they paint legal, commissioned murals. They started off as Those Damn Kids; now they represent the dream kontinuing.

M.O.I. JR: What happened to him? When?

Pendarvis: What happened? I guess you’re talking about his death, right? Well, after Mike Dream made his name on the walls of a train yard over near 23rd Ave in East Oakland – after he had tasted stardom – he was featured in magazines and traveled on the strength of his art.

Mike Dream was killed in what has been reported as a robbery. It happened in West Oakland. He was 30.

His son had just been born months earlier, too. Today, his son is a high school football playing-skateboarding-cool kid who is also a member of TDK; you know he represents the dream kontinuing.

M.O.I. JR: What exactly does “TDK: The Dream Kontinues” analyze?

Pendarvis: Before we get to the story of Mike Dream and TDK, the film starts off by analyzing the cat and mouse relationship between graffiti artists, or “writers” as they call themselves, and City abatement workers. Without graffiti removal efforts of the City, the young taggers wouldn’t have a fresh canvas to test their skills in hopes of growing to the status of a top artist with a name that rings bells in certain circles, like King Fresh, Vogue or Dream – all of whom are referenced in the film.

M.O.I. JR: How has the community that knew Dream responded?

Pendarvis: It’s been cool to see. I’ve met Asian folks from Alameda who knew Dream back in the day, and they’ve thanked me for making the film about their old friend. I’ve also shown it to my older homie, Black dude from Richmond, and he was brought back to his days as a kid – when he got his shirts airbrushed by Dream at Hilltop.

I showed it to my teacher who didn’t know him at all, and she was fascinated – ended up writing an article about it in National Geographic. And most importantly, TDK has given me good feedback. There are a couple of notes I left out and things I glazed over, but you can only fit so much in a 20-minute film.

M.O.I. JR: How has his graf family TDK responded?

Pendarvis Harshaw

Pendarvis Harshaw

Pendarvis: Again, TDK has shown nothing but love. John, Dream’s brother, has been the coolest. Akil, Dream’s son – I’ve been to one of his football games. I stay in contact with a couple members of the crew now – shout out to Spie, Amend and the crew over at Five & Dime Tattoo parlor.

M.O.I. JR: How does it feel to be accepted into the Oakland International Film Fest?

Pendarvis: It feels good. It’s my first screening at a film festival. I’ve held a couple smaller community screenings, but this will be the biggest audience. I’m hoping that they’ll enjoy my thesis project as much as my professor did; at least this time I’m not nervous – I don’t have a degree on the line, just praise from the film fest folks. Being accepted is praise in itself.

“TDK: The Dream Kontinues” will screen in the Oakland International Film Fest on opening night, Thursday, April 2, ’15, at the Grand Lake Theater in Oakland between 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. It will also run earlier that day, at 12-2 p.m. at the Bal Theater in San Leandro. Check oiff.org for more information.

The People’s Minister of Information JR Valrey is associate editor of the Bay View, author of “Block Reportin’” and “Unfinished Business: Block Reportin’ 2” and filmmaker of “Operation Small Axe” and “Block Reportin’ 101,” available, along with many more interviews, at www.blockreportradio.com. He can be reached atblockreportradio@gmail.com.



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Written by Tyler Kingkade    Wednesday, 25 March 2015 21:18    PDF Print E-mail
Viciously beaten University of Virginia honor student Martese Johnson did not have a fake ID, attorney says

The bloody arrest of University of Virginia student Martese Johnson all started when an employee for a local bar approached him on a sidewalk, Johnson’s attorney, Daniel Watkins, said in a press conference Thursday, March 19.

University of Virginia honor student Martese Johnson was viciously beaten by white police March 18. At the highly ranked school, average SAT scores regularly exceed 1300, and there are typically fewer than 1,500 African American students among the 21,000-member student body. Black students report feeling ostracized.

University of Virginia honor student Martese Johnson was viciously beaten by white police March 18. At the highly ranked school, average SAT scores regularly exceed 1300, and there are typically fewer than 1,500 African American students among the 21,000-member student body. Black students report feeling ostracized.

Watkins said his client was never in possession of a fake ID and was simply standing on the sidewalk when the bar employee walked up to him. The student’s subsequent arrest, which UVA officials havedescribed as “brutal” and “highly unusual,”prompted Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe to order a state investigationWednesday into the behavior of the Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control agents who took Johnson into custody.

Johnson was standing near the Trinity Irish Pub around 12:30 a.m. Wednesday, Watkins said, when “an employee of the establishment approached him and asked for his license.”

The employee quizzed Johnson about his zip code, and Johnson provided his mother’s current zip code, Watkins said. The number is different from the one listed on his current Illinois license. Watkins said that at that point, Virginia ABC agents questioned Johnson about being in possession of false identification.

Johnson is originally from Chicago, where his mother still lives. He was never in possession of a fake ID, Watkins said.

The Virginia ABC agents then forced Johnson to the ground, where they handcuffed him while “his face and skull [were] bleeding and needing surgery, all of this over two alleged offenses,” Watkins said.

Virginia ABC declined to comment further about the incident to The Huffington Post on Thursday. Trinity Irish Pub told HuffPost it had no comment. Watkins declined to take questions Thursday.

“I’m shocked that my face was slammed into the brick pavement just across the street from where I go to school,” Johnson said in a statement, read by Watkins. As Johnson was on the ground, he added, “One thought raced through my mind: How could this happen? I still believe in our community. I know this community will support me during this time.”

UVA students marched on campus Wednesday night and Thursday in protest of what they believe was excessive force used by Virginia ABC agents. Johnson has asked for activists to remain civil in their protests.

Black students at prestigious schools are racially profiled

Former White House correspondent for Politico Joseph Williams reported for Takepart.com that the “attack against Johnson, a third-year student and member of the University of Virginia’s Honor Council, exposed long-standing racial tensions at arguably one of the country’s most prestigious universities. It also seemed to confirm what African American men have asserted for years: that racial profiling can happen to them just as easily on an affluent, predominantly white college campus as it does in hardscrabble Black neighborhoods.

Martese Johnson, before and after the beating

Martese Johnson, before and after the beating

“Johnson, who reportedly suffered head wounds that needed nearly a dozen stitches to close, was charged with resisting arrest, obstruction of justice, and drunk and disorderly conduct, yet he wasn’t charged for allegedly using counterfeit identification, according to local news reports. He was released on $1,500 bail the morning after his arrest.

“The incident happened just before 1 a.m. outside Trinity Irish Pub, a bar on the edge of Virginia’s Charlottesville campus. …

“’Martese was talking to the bouncer, and there was some discrepancy about his ID,’ student Bryan Beaubrun told the campus paper. ‘[An] ABC officer approaches Martese and grabs him by the elbow…and pulls him to the side.’

“Moments later, officers from both the Charlottesville and University of Virginia police departments arrived on the scene, and things quickly escalated, Beaubrun told the paper.

“’It happened so quickly. Out of nowhere I saw the two officers wrestling Martese to the ground. I was shocked that it escalated that quickly,’ he said. ‘Eventually [Johnson was] on the ground, they’re trying to put handcuffs on him, and their knees were on his back.’

“At some point during the altercation, Johnson suffered a head wound; bystanders took pictures and recorded the arrest on cell phone cameras. It didn’t take long for the images to appear on social media.

“Within hours of Johnson’s arrest, a coalition of African American students circulated an email accusing police and the ABC agent of unnecessary force and demanding action. They also organized a ‘teach-in’ and an on-campus march Wednesday evening to demonstrate their anger. …

“Johnson … urged demonstrators to use the incident as a rallying point for unity. ‘We’re all part of one community,’ he said. ‘And we deserve to respect each other, especially at times like this.’”

Tyler Kingkade, senior editor and reporter for the Huffington Post, where this story first appeared, can be reached on Twitter: @tylerkingkade. To Kingkade’s story, the Bay View has added excerpts from aTakepart.com story by Joseph Williams, former White House bureau chief for Politico, who can be reached atjoewilliamsdc@gmail.com; and read his blog, The Big Picture.



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Written by Minister of Information JR Valrey    Monday, 16 March 2015 19:37    PDF Print E-mail
Manager PK remembers the Jacka

he People’s Minister of Information JR

PK and the Jacka at the release of “Tear Gas” on June 16, 2009. – Photo: D-Ray, Ozone Magazine

PK and the Jacka at the release of “Tear Gas” on June 16, 2009. – Photo: D-Ray, Ozone Magazine

PK is known around the Bay as the hardest working manager there is to have in Northern Cali Hip Hop. He manages many of the Mob Figaz and their affiliates in the music industry, but he is most famous for his work behind the scenes with the career of the Jacka.

The Jacka was murdered on Feb. 2, 2015, in East Oakland, leaving a void in the political, social and spiritual consciousness that he laced his word-play with in much the same way that the assassination of Tupac did to the West Coast Hip Hop community.

PK and the Jacka reached celebrity status together, travelled together, worked daily together and that is why I wanted to have one of the people in Jacka’s inner circle discuss the road that the Jacka travelled to Hip Hop greatness. Here is my comrade and Brotha of more than a decade, PK, talkin’ about his life alongside the Jacka in his own words.

M.O.I. JR: How did you and the Jacka meet? How long did y’all work together?

PK: We met through a mutual friend in high school. Jack was close to my boy Tron and his family. We would hangout on the weekends; he used to cut my hair. He was already known for doing music and being dope back then. That was around 1995.

PK and the Jacka in November 2014 – Photo: D-Ray, Ozone Magazine

PK and the Jacka in November 2014 – Photo: D-Ray, Ozone Magazine

We started working together in 2002 after I came back home from college.

M.O.I. JR: What is the story behind how you guys started working together?

PK: When I came home from college, my boy Sef asked me to manage his group, Kali Fam. I had never thought about being a manager, but I was already working with artists, putting together projects and promoting events. I decided to do it and, being that me and Jack already had an established relationship and were together all the time, the business relationship developed naturally.

M.O.I. JR: As a manager, what were some of the highlights of your career with the Jacka?

PK: All the steps were memorable moments, from the early days of proving ourselves and getting to know everyone to giving others opportunity and being known all over. We always did what we wanted, on our own, with our team.

All our different studios with different artists coming by, the songs and jokes, all our travels around the world, the big album releases and shows – they all mean everything to me.

We went to Djibouti, Africa, for a week with Freeway, Erk and Dom Kennedy. One of the best trips ever. We didn’t even know where we were going when I booked the show. Had never heard of the country. Can’t wait to go back.

When the “Tear Gas” album dropped in 2009, that was really big for us. The energy at that time was the best. Jack had a couple songs on rotation on the radio. Every day was something new, fun and profitable.

PK and the Jacka in Seattle – Photo: D-Ray, Ozone Magazine

PK and the Jacka in Seattle – Photo: D-Ray, Ozone Magazine

Linking up with artists like Freeway and Paul Wall, who really feel our movement and music. We recorded projects as well as traveled around the world with both of them.

M.O.I. JR: How would you compare the Bay Area losses of Mac Dre and Tupac to the loss of the Jacka off of the Hip Hop scene locally?

PK: It’s the same thing. Another leader in our hip hop community killed for no reason. Everyone knew and loved Jack and had personally experienced him. The radio supported him. He was clearly the man and loved by everyone.

His music means a lot to people. It has helped a lot of people get through hard times, taught plenty of people how to do plenty of things and helped numerous people develop closer relationships to God. Artists don’t rap like he does or say the things he says. We are really going to miss that.

M.O.I. JR: Who are some of the other acts that you manage?

PK: Husalah, Freeway, Traxamillion, Rob Lo … bunch more.

M.O.I. JR: Are there any suspects in the murder of the Jacka?

PK: There’s a lot of talk and rumors.

M.O.I. JR: How much music did the Jacka leave behind?

PK: More than I can say. He was always in the studio working with different artists and producers. He has several projects both solo and group already ready to go.

M.O.I. JR: How could people keep up with everything Jacka related?

PK: www.theJacka.com, Instagram @jackamobfigaz, Twitter @theJacka, YouTube JackaMobFigaz1, Facebook Jackamobfigaz

The People’s Minister of Information JR Valrey is associate editor of the Bay View, author of “Block Reportin’” and “Unfinished Business: Block Reportin’ 2” and filmmaker of “Operation Small Axe” and “Block Reportin’ 101,” available, along with many more interviews, at www.blockreportradio.com. He can be reached atblockreportradio@gmail.com.


The Jacka’s manager, PK (Prashant Kumar) of Golden Mean Management, is interviewed by Laura Anthony, ABC7, on Feb. 4, two days after the Jacka was killed.



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Written by Minister of Information JR Valrey    Monday, 16 March 2015 19:36    PDF Print E-mail
'Hard Times/Good Times’: an interview wit’ rapper T-Rydah

T-Rydah, one third of the Black Panther Fugitives rap group, is gearing up to release a solo album, produced solely by Jamil, another member of the group, this spring called “Hard Times/Good Times.” The Fugitives was founded by the group members as well as the former Chief of Staff of the Black Panther Party David Hilliard and his son Doreen to speak to some of the issues facing Black and oppressed people today. In the early 2000s, they dropped two albums. Today you can find T-Rydah, Jamil and their Red Camera shooting videos, recording vocals or listening to some of Jamil’s beats. Check out T-Rydah speaking for himself.

T-Rydah and Jamil

T-Rydah and Jamil

M.O.I. JR: Can you talk a little bit about how you got into Hip Hop? Who did you listen to back then?

T-Rydah: Wow, this is history. Well, I got into Hip Hop in the mid ‘80s, due to this being music that a young ghetto boy could easily relate to and needed. Growing up in the Acorns (Acorn projects) in West Oakland, you need anything to keep you from falling into the pressures of running the streets, and trying to bust raps was one of them.

Man, I listened to any and everything back then. If you liked rap, you pretty much listened to everything: Run DMC, LL Cool J, The Fat Boys, Big Daddy Kane, Kool G. Rap, Ice T, Eazy E, NWA, Pac, Hammer, E40, The Click, Ice Cube, Snoop Dogg, KRS 1, Nas, A Tribe Called Quest, Naughty by Nature, the Native Tongue crew, P.E., Too Short, Askari X, Digital Underground, Outkast, Goodie Mob , Scarface, Geto Boys, AMW, MC Breed, Sir Mix Alot , JJ Fad , 357, Fresh Prince & Jeff, Dj Quik, and the list goes on.

M.O.I. JR: Who made you want to become a rapper? When was that?

T-Rydah: A lot of things made me want to rap, but if I got to pinpoint it, I would say Eazy E. I can remember getting the “Eazy Duz It” LP and I would bump that shit like every day, not even tripping off the explicit words he was using, because we all believed he was as young as we were, and was going through some of the same things we would see living in the projects, hood, ghetto etc. So about ’88 or ‘89 is when I really thought I could do it .

M.O.I. JR: How did you become a member of the Black Panther Fugitives?

T-Rydah: Well, a childhood friend, my dude Maja Gutta put me in the mix with one of now my closest friends and business partner, Mr. James Calhoun, who is one of the only children born into the Black Panther Party. He introduced me to David and Doreen Hilliard, who formed the Black Panther Fugitives in 2002 to bridge this history with the masses who forgot about the struggle that paved the way for the rights we so freely have now, like music and how we can speak it the way we want.

T-Rydah 'Hard Times Good Times' coverM.O.I. JR: What made you start doing your solo thing?

T-Rydah: My love for the art and my desire to make change in society is strong and sensible enough to make change or focus attention on issues most rappers like to sugarcoat around or shy away from these days, due to the corporate giants that have watered down the creation we used to call our own.

M.O.I. JR: How long have you been working on your solo album? When is it coming out?

T-Rydah: This has been a long process compared to how they just throw garbage out now, with the fast moving social media world we live in. We have been at this one for about three years too long, but good things come to those who wait, and the cooking is always better when ya slow cook.

M.O.I. JR: What is it like working with your comrade Jamil from the Black Panther Fugitives on the project? What is y’all’s creative process like?

T-Rydah: Working with Jay – “Tha General” is what I like to call him – is like working with the original. I tell him all the time he is one of the last from the era of true Hip Hop. It’s like working with a Dj Premier, Dre, Marley Marl, the Bomb Squad, Q-tip, DJ Pooh, Shock G – you get the point. It’s like working with the Spurs.

We know how to build and keep a winning program. Only thing now is winning the title or at least going gold, with this “Hard Times/Good Times” project.

M.O.I. JR: How can people keep up with your movement?

T-Rydah: They can follow my T’Rydah fan page on Facebook or visit T-Rydah.com, which we are continuing to improve on.

The People’s Minister of Information JR Valrey is associate editor of the Bay View, author of “Block Reportin’” and “Unfinished Business: Block Reportin’ 2” and filmmaker of “Operation Small Axe” and “Block Reportin’ 101,” available, along with many more interviews, at www.blockreportradio.com. He can be reached atblockreportradio@gmail.com.



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Written by Minister of Information JR Valrey    Monday, 16 March 2015 19:36    PDF Print E-mail
13th Annual Oakland International Film Festival April 2-5

The Oakland International Film Fest – April 2-5 this year at venues all around the East Bay – is one of the premiere events annually in the Bay Area. The 2015 showcase of films highlights a plethora of genres from all over the world.

'Melvin and Jean An American Story' graphicThis year, one of the headlining films is a documentary called “Melvin and Jean: An American Story” about relatively unknown Black Panthers Melvin and Jean, who hijacked a plane in the ‘60s and continued to live as U.S. fugitives all over the world, but could never come back to the U.S. except in chains and shackles. Another film being featured is “M Cream,” a film about hashish, a marijuana derivative.

In the past, the Oakland International Film Fest featured the classic slavery film “Sankofa,” as well as the political thriller that was outlawed in the ‘70s because of its Black revolutionary content, “The Spook Who Sat by the Door.”

So to introduce this year’s activities we reached out to the co-founder and director of the Oakland International Film Fest, the one and only David Roach, for a Q&A.

M.O.I. JR: Why did you choose Oakland to do an international film festival?

David Roach: After producing the film, “Sydney Byrd Private Eye,” and having it screened in a few film festivals, I was trying to figure out how we could better network filmmakers in Oakland. And I was crossing the bridge coming from San Francisco and the sign read: “Welcome to Oakland.” This sign I have read a thousand times, but this day it meant The Oakland International Film Festival.

M.O.I. JR: How would you compare the selections for this upcoming film festival with those in past years?

A highlight of the Bay View’s first Black Media Appreciation Night, held Nov. 26, 2012, at Yoshi’s in Oakland, was the presentation of an award for the festival to David Roach by Sauce the Boss, then a regular on the Block Report Radio show on KPFA. – Photo: Scott Braley

A highlight of the Bay View’s first Black Media Appreciation Night, held Nov. 26, 2012, at Yoshi’s in Oakland, was the presentation of an award for the festival to David Roach by Sauce the Boss, then a regular on the Block Report Radio show on KPFA. – Photo: Scott Braley

David Roach: This year, we received more international entries and narratives with a “green” or environmental theme as well as feature films “Made in Oakland.”

M.O.I. JR: What are some of the headlining films for this year’s festival?”

David Roach: “Melvin and Jean : An American Story” is a powerful documentary that tells the story of two former Black Panthers who hijacked a plane in the late ‘60s to escape the United States and build a new life in Algeria and later France.

In “M Cream,” a motley crew of university students sets out on a journey in pursuit of a mythical form of hash, confronting a series of encounters that begin to unravel the myriad realities of rebellion. “The Shop” is about two friends who get into a big mess when one of them inherits a 1966 Mustang and finds a large stash of diamonds hidden in the car’s engine. Too many flicks to name here.

M.O.I. JR: Where will the festival be this year?

David Roach: The main screenings will be held at the Grand Lake Theater, The Bal Theater in San Leandro, The Black Repertory Theater and Geoffreys Inner Circle and workshops and panels at various venues.

M.O.I. JR: Who are some of the filmmakers who will be in attendance?

David Roach: Shawn Cunningham, David Lockhart, Samm Styles and many more to be announced.

M.O.I. JR: Can you talk about some of the headlining films that you featured in the past? Can you also talk about some of the VIPs that you brought to the festival in the recent past?

With the visit of Sam Greenlee, celebrated – and persecuted – for his film, “The Spook Who Sat by the Door,” on April 8, 2012, not long before he died, the Oakland International Film Festival made history. Here are Greenlee, David Roach and The People’s Minister of Information JR at the Oakland Museum, where the festival was held that year.

With the visit of Sam Greenlee, celebrated – and persecuted – for his film, “The Spook Who Sat by the Door,” on April 8, 2012, not long before he died, the Oakland International Film Festival made history. Here are Greenlee, David Roach and The People’s Minister of Information JR at the Oakland Museum, where the festival was held that year.

David Roach: “The Spook Who Sat by the Door” was one film I will never forget because the writer, Sam Greenlee, came that year and passed away a couple of years later. Roger Guenveur Smith produced a film and attended at festival in the early years, as well as Terri Vaughn, Shabaka Henley are a few celebrities that come to mind. Also, having the Angolan Film Commission attending our festival to represent a film that told their story towards independence are highlights for me.

M.O.I. JR: Where do you see this festival going in the next five years?

David Roach: In five years, the Oakland International Film Festival will become a major destination for filmmakers around the world to attend, bringing additional revenue to the entire East Bay: That’s where we are going.

M.O.I. JR: How do people stay in touch with the Oakland International Film Fest?

David Roach: Our website, http://oiff.org and Twitter.com/oiff are the best ways to stay abreast of our affairs.

The People’s Minister of Information JR Valrey is associate editor of the Bay View, author of “Block Reportin’” and “Unfinished Business: Block Reportin’ 2” and filmmaker of “Operation Small Axe” and “Block Reportin’ 101,” available, along with many more interviews, at www.blockreportradio.com. He can be reached atblockreportradio@gmail.com.



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